Institution of Mechanical Engineers IMechE

Fukushima: New wine is old wineskins?

24 May 2011

The events at Fukushima in Japan have knocked over the notion growing in many countries that a nuclear renaissance was inevitable. The scale of the accident, involving multiple reactors and the way it ran across the global news for weeks with a different problem being face almost every day, has challenged the idea that the nuclear industry has learned the lessons and is a now safe and sound means of generating electricity. The talk will attempt to explain what went wrong at Fukushima and the choices that the Japanese authorities had to make in the aftermath of the unprecedented earthquake that hit Japan on 11 March. It will start the process of learning the new lessons of Fukushima and consider whether the effects of the accident might be felt more by old reactors like those at Fukushima, or newer ones such as those planned to be built in the UK.

Presented by: Mr. Tony Roulstone MA CEng FIMechE MIET

Following a degree in engineering at Cambridge, he was trained as an officer in the British Army and served in Germany and Northern Ireland, before leaving to join the UKAEA working on fast reactor developments at Dounreay in the North of Scotland. He then spent 20 years with Rolls-Royce. Initially, this was as an engineer in nuclear submarine propulsion and later as the Engineering Director, at the time when the new nuclear reactor for the Vanguard class of submarines was being tested, produced and delivered. Moving to the Aerospace division of Rolls-Royce in 1990, he led the engineering teams responsible for all the engine controls systems of their civil and military engines. During this time these systems moved from being largely mechanical in nature to being computer controlled and software based. In the mid 1990s, he became MD of the nuclear group of companies and ran and developed the group for 5 years. This group included businesses that served both civil and military nuclear programmes mainly in the UK as well as broader combustion boilers and specialist mechanical equipment world-wide. For the final period in Rolls-Royce, he led an ambitious business efficiency and change programme for the whole company covering aerospace and industrial power groups located both in the UK, US and around the world. For the last 10 years, he has been working as an independent business consultant for large international companies in the areas of strategy, business change and the management of large programmes. As the UK has re-discovered the merits of nuclear energy over recent years, he has been doing more consulting in the nuclear sector. During the last six months, he has worked with members of the University of Cambridge to construct and promote a new taught masters course (MPhil) in Nuclear Energy. The course aims to train a new generation of engineers, scientists and managers for the emerging nuclear renaissance in the UK and around the world. The course will be run from the Department of Engineering but in conjunction with, and with the support of the Departments of Materials Science & Metallurgy, Physics and Earth Sciences and the Judge Business School. He is the inaugural Course Director for the MPhil in Nuclear Energy and is an affiliated lecturer in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge.

Clips:

Fukushima - New wine in old wineskins? Annual Lecture

: Tony Roulstone MA CEng FIMechE MIET

Following a degree in engineering at Cambridge, he was trained as an officer in the British Army and served in Germany and Northern Ireland, before leaving to join the UKAEA working on fast reactor developments at Dounreay in the North of Scotland. He then spent 20 years with Rolls-Royce. Initially, this was as an engineer in nuclear submarine propulsion and later as the Engineering Director, at the time when the new nuclear reactor for the Vanguard class of submarines was being tested, produced and delivered. Moving to the Aerospace division of Rolls-Royce in 1990, he led the engineering teams responsible for all the engine controls systems of their civil and military engines. During this time these systems moved from being largely mechanical in nature to being computer controlled and software based. In the mid 1990s, he became MD of the nuclear group of companies and ran and developed the group for 5 years. This group included businesses that served both civil and military nuclear programmes mainly in the UK as well as broader combustion boilers and specialist mechanical equipment world-wide. For the final period in Rolls-Royce, he led an ambitious business efficiency and change programme for the whole company covering aerospace and industrial power groups located both in the UK, US and around the world. For the last 10 years, he has been working as an independent business consultant for large international companies in the areas of strategy, business change and the management of large programmes. As the UK has re-discovered the merits of nuclear energy over recent years, he has been doing more consulting in the nuclear sector. During the last six months, he has worked with members of the University of Cambridge to construct and promote a new taught masters course (MPhil) in Nuclear Energy. The course aims to train a new generation of engineers, scientists and managers for the emerging nuclear renaissance in the UK and around the world. The course will be run from the Department of Engineering but in conjunction with, and with the support of the Departments of Materials Science & Metallurgy, Physics and Earth Sciences and the Judge Business School. He is the inaugural Course Director for the MPhil in Nuclear Energy and is an affiliated lecturer in the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge.

Duration: 1:45